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Level 2 Stocksperson Apprenticeship StandardApply Now »

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Level: 2

Location: Workplace

Years: 1

Interview:

Course Summary

The key role for a stockperson is to raise animals with optimal welfare and consideration for their needs throughout the different stages of their life. This is practical work involving a combination of technology and manual labour. Being a stockperson requires compassion, self-motivation and the ability to work both in a team and independently.

You will be provided with a solid foundation in a broad range of skills required to work competently within the livestock industry. You will learn and develop practical skills and knowledge from your workplace which can then be built upon at College to ensure a well-rounded understanding of caring for livestock.

College attendance is required on a fortnightly day-release basis.

Entry requirements

You must be employed within and committed to a career in the agriculture industry. You will undergo an initial assessment before starting the programme to ensure that you are capable of achieving the outcomes and have an interest in this area of work.

NB. If you do not currently have employment in the agriculture industry, we can help you with this too. Please look at our website for current vacancies.

Course Content

The apprenticeship includes:

  • Level 2 Stockperson standard – comprising core skills, knowledge and behaviours which are needed to cover the generic requirements for looking after animals competently. An additional ‘options’ unit is then selected from dairy, beef, pigs and sheep to give more specific skills needed to fulfil the needs of different livestock sectors.
  • Level 3 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work
  • Level 2 Award in the Safe Use of Pesticides

On completion of the pesticides foundation unit, you can also choose one of the following units:

- Boom sprayer, mounted, trailed or self-propelled equipment

- Granular applicator equipment

- Handheld applicator equipment

  • Functional Skills: English and Maths Level 1 and/or Level 2, depending on your GCSE results

How will I be assessed?

On-programme assessment includes:

  • Apprentice journal: the apprentice should record experiences gained through the learning
  • Workbook/portfolio of evidence to demonstrate practical ability and theoretical understanding
  • Written and practical tests: designed to prepare the apprentice for the end-point assessment and test seasonal elements
  • Employer appraisals: to monitor performance

End-point assessment includes:

  • Online multiple-choice test of knowledge
  • Workplace observation of practical tasks containing a range of activities for the core units and option unit chosen
  • Professional discussion based on the learner's workbook/portfolio

Are there any additional costs or specialist equipment required?

You will need safety boots, overalls, waterproofs and writing materials.

What can I do after this course?

On completion of the apprenticeship, suitably able candidates will be able to progress to supervisory/management level positions within the industry and potentially further qualifications.

Did you find the course information on this page useful?

 

Daniel Wall

Daniel Wall

Trainee alpaca shearer Daniel sets out on his next life adventure

Trainee alpaca shearer Daniel Wall says the teaching and mentoring he received at Broomfield Hall has prepared him for his next adventure in life.  
 
Daniel, who is 20, recently left DCG after completing his level 3 Agriculture course with distinction. He is now working alongside an experienced specialist alpaca shearer near his hometown of Redcar, with his job taking him to alpaca farms all over the UK.  
 
Shearing alpacas – unlike shearing sheep – is a two-person job, and at around 15 minutes per animal, it takes five times as long. The shearing method is also quite different – alpacas have to be rolled onto their sides – and Daniel is grateful to Broomfield Hall for letting him practise his shearing technique.  
 
He said: “The Broomfield Hall college and facilities are lovely and my lecturers have been great. They helped me achieve the best grade I could. They never failed to teach us something new every lesson and gave us valuable life knowledge. I’m lucky to have had them teaching and mentoring me as they’ve enabled me to start my next adventure in life.”  
 
Daniel is keen to return to College to talk to students about his time there and has offered to help shear Broomfield’s alpacas next year.  
 
As well as two “brilliant” college trips to the Zetor tractor factory in the Czech Republic, Daniel also listed the “togetherness” of the agriculture students as one of the highlights of College life.  
 
He added: “Although we were taught separately, students doing levels 1, 2 and 3 mixed with each other. Broomfield Hall felt like one big family and I think that’s important in an education establishment.”  

“The Broomfield Hall college and facilities are lovely and my lecturers have been great. They helped me achieve the best grade I could. They never failed to teach us something new every lesson and gave us valuable life knowledge. I’m lucky to have had them teaching and mentoring me as they’ve enabled me to start my next adventure in life.”

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