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Apprenticeship - Horse Management - Level 3Apply Now »

Course Image
Level: 3

Location: Workplace

Years: 1

Interview: Y

Course Summary

An apprenticeship is made up of a 'framework' which incorporates a work-based Diploma together with a Technical Certificate, Employment Rights and Responsibilities (ERR), Personal Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS) and Functional Skills in Maths and English (unless you have achieved GCSE Maths and English at grade C or above in the past five years.)

The Technical Certificate is the British Horse Society Stage 3 Care. Derby College will pay for one entry per exam for the Care element only.

Entry requirements

You must be in employment, have completed a Level 2 Horse Care qualification and be committed to a career in the equine industry. You will undergo an initial assessment before starting the programme to ensure that you are capable of achieving the outcomes and have an interest in this area of work.

Course Content

You must complete seven core mandatory units and a further three additional units. You may then choose between a Riding or Coaching pathway to make up the total amount of credits required for the Diploma.

Mandatory units are:

  • Receive a horse and carry out initial assessment
  • Plan diets and feeding regimes
  • Monitor and maintain stocks of feed and bedding
  • Promote health and wellbeing
  • Deliver basic treatments to horses
  • Promote health, safety and security
  • Manage your own resources

Additional units are:

  • Tack up horses for specialist work
  • Clip horses
  • Exercise and improve horse’s performance using lunging or long reining

Riding pathway units are:

  • Ride horses for exercise
  • Ride schooled horses to maintain training
  • Jump schooled horses to maintain training

Coaching pathway units:

  • Collect and analyse information and prepare for coaching sessions
  • Prepare for, conduct and evaluate equine coaching sessions

How will I be assessed?

Training is largely work-based with on-going practical assessments undertaken in your workplace. You will keep a portfolio of evidence of your practical ability and theoretical understanding. Assessment is through practical observation in the workplace and at College, written questions, witness statements and photographic or/and video evidence which can be used.

Are there any additional costs or specialist equipment required?

College requirements are: steel toe-cap boots, correct standard riding hat, gloves, schooling and jumping whip and a body protector.

What can I do after this course?

Further study
You can progress to higher management qualifications or further industry qualifications.

Careers
You can advance your career in full–time employment in an equine yard in a management role such as Head Lad/Girl.

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Gabrielle Madders

Gabrielle Madders

Dissertation in equine assisted learning achieves publication

Research by a talented Derby College Higher Education student could influence the way equine assisted learning is used to benefit adolescents with complex educational needs.  
 
Part of Gabrielle Madders’ dissertation found that usually non-verbal individuals began to communicate with their peers through their interactions with horses.  
 
The study was so academically valuable that it has appeared in the highly respected Advanced Journal of Undergraduate Research.  
 
Gabrielle, 24, came to DCG to study for her Equine Science Management and Training degree top up year, with a view to becoming a lecturer. She examined whether young people aged 16-23, with a range of conditions on the autistic spectrum, engaged better following interactive sessions, which saw horses being used as a learning intervention tool.  
 
While Gabrielle found no significant overall improvement, she did find that specific activities such as leading exercises and physical contact with the horses did have a positive impact. It's hoped that these findings will pave the way for future research on the topic.  
 
Lecturer Ruth Orrell-Stokes, a former DCG student herself, recognised the value of the study and supported Gabrielle in getting it published.  
 
Gabrielle, who grew up on a farm and has always, loved horses, said: “Achieving a first is something I am extremely proud of. I never thought at the start of the year that this academic success was possible, but through my time at Derby College I really learnt to have confidence in my ability, which I believe has allowed me to excel. I will be forever grateful for all the time they gave me, which has allowed me to take my next steps towards my career with confidence and drive”.  
 
Currently enjoying her job as a welfare helpline co-ordinator with the British Horse Society, Gabrielle intends to take a Masters next year and still plans to become a lecturer at some stage.

My lecturers were always supportive and they really pushed me to be the best that I could be.

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