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Diploma in Light Vehicle Maintenance and Repair - Level 2Apply Now »

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Level: 2

Location: Johnson Building

Years: 1

Interview: Y

Course Summary

This Level 2 course is for those wishing to specialise in Light Vehicle Maintenance and Repair for a career in the motor industry or for those wanting to progress to Level 3 and even university-level courses afterwards. 

It is designed for school and college leavers who have already achieved grade C or above in BOTH Maths and English. There is also an optional Level 3 Maths unit available for those wishing to progress to Level 3 or higher.

Entry requirements

You must have achieved BOTH Maths and English GCSE at grade 4 or above and should have passed the mechanical comprehension entrance test, alongside having a successful interview.

Course Content

You will study:

  • Health and Safety
  • Tools, Equipment and Materials
  • Routine Light Vehicle Maintenance
  • Engine Systems and Components
  • Chassis Systems and Components
  • Electrical Systems and Components
  • Transmission Systems and Components
  • Inspecting Light Vehicles Using Prescribed Methods
  • M3 - A-level equivalent maths units (optional)
  • A minimum of five days work experience in a motor vehicle environment

How will I be assessed?

Underpinning knowledge will be assessed via online external tests and assignments for all units.  Practical activities are assessed in our centre using externally set criteria.  M3 Maths and G3 job roles are assessed by written assignments and online exams.

Are there any additional costs or specialist equipment required?

You must provide your own steel toe-capped boots to be worn at all times in the workshops.  A £40 fee will be required for College overalls, sweatshirts and T-shirts.

What can I do after this course?

Subject to achieving the Level 2 Diploma in Light Vehicle Maintenance and Repair (VRQ) and the optional M3 Maths units, you can progress to the Level 3 Advanced Diploma in Light Vehicle Maintenance and Repair. Without the M3 Maths unit, your pathway would be restricted to an apprenticeship (if employment is secured).

Even with the M3 Maths unit, and with employment as an apprentice, you can progress to the Intermediate Apprenticeship Level 2 Diploma in Light Vehicle Maintenance and Repair Competence (VCQ).

Want to know more about life in the motor industry? Why not visit www.autocity.org.uk/world-of-work for an introduction?

Did you find the course information on this page useful?

 

This course is run at the Johnson Building

About the Johnson Building »

Cat Treanor

Cat Treanor

Award-winning DCG Motor Vehicle apprentice Cat is STEM ambassador

Giving talks to thousands of people at automotive industry events across the USA holds no fears for former Derby College motor vehicle apprentice Cat Treanor.   
 
Cat, who is business development manager with Electude UK, a world-leading automotive e-learning company, has spoken at venues in New York, California and Texas to name just a few.  
 
And, as a STEM ambassador, a voluntary role, she also goes into schools and colleges to talk to students about rewarding opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects.  
 
Now nearly 27, Cat loves to give talks but is convinced she wouldn’t be doing this had it not been for the lecturers on her motor vehicle engineering level 3 course at the Johnson Building.  
 
She said: “Through my public speaking I’ve been able to reach and inspire thousands of people in one go and last year I won an award for my work promoting diversity in the trade. Public speaking is the thing I’m most proud of and I’m so thankful to the Derby College lecturers who encouraged me to try it. Without them I wouldn’t have known I was capable of addressing a roomful of people.”  
 
Through STEM and her job, Cat – the 2013 winner of Derby College’s Manufacturing and Engineering Apprenticeship award – remains keen to do all she can to encourage more women into the automotive industry.  
 
She added: “The situation is improving – we’ve seen more girls joining the sector in recent years – but progress is slow. The measures designed to inspire female students take time to feed through. However, with the electric vehicle revolution the trade is changing and needs a new kind of technician.”

Through my public speaking I’ve been able to reach and inspire thousands of people in one go and last year I won an award for my work promoting diversity in the trade. Public speaking is the thing I’m most proud of and I’m so thankful to the Derby College lecturers who encouraged me to try it. Without them I wouldn’t have known I was capable of addressing a roomful of people.

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