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Politics (A-level)Apply Now »

Note - you only need to make one application for A-levels. You can specify the additional A-Levels you wish to study when you fill out the application form

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Level: 3

Location: Joseph Wright Centre

Years: 2

Adult Loan Amount: 1987.00****

Interview: Y

Course Summary

This well-established course looks at issues in the news and applies these to the basic ideas of democracy in the UK and the way the UK is governed, comparing them with the USA.  It also examines some of the political ideologies and political ideological ideas behind our contemporary political system, drawing upon historical events.

Entry requirements

You will need at least five GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, including English Language at grade 5 (C/B) and Maths at grade 4 (C).

A recent school report will be required which demonstrates a committed attitude to learning.

It is assumed that students enrol on a two-year A-level programme of study consisting of three or more subjects. However, students will be expected to demonstrate a committed attitude to learning and make positive progress in their first year of study.

Course Content

Component 1: Government and Politics of the UK and Component 2: Government and Politics of the USA and Comparative Politics

  • Democracy
  • Pressure Groups
  • Political and Ideological Ideas
  • Elections
  • Parliament/Congress
  • The Prime Minister and Cabinet/Executive
  • The Constitution
  • The Judiciary
  • Europe
  • Digital Democracy

Component 3: Political Ideologies

  • Conservatism
  • Liberalism
  • Socialism
  • Ecologism (this is negotiable and subject to change)

We also have visits and talks by prominent politicians.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment is 100% by three essay-based examinations at the end of Year 2. There is no coursework or project element.

Are there any additional costs or specialist equipment required?

It is advisable to look at AS Politics by Andrew Heywood (green 5th edition, 2015), although newer material is set for release.

It is also useful to look at Political Ideologies and Introduction to US Politics by Andrew Heywood and Anthony Bennett and the book US Government and Politics.

At this stage several new publications are due for imminent publishing and a textbook for each component will be recommended in class.

Access to the internet on a smart phone or tablet is also useful - but not compulsory - for Components 1 and 2 to enable additional reading.

What can I do after this course?

Careers 

  • Law - barrister or solicitor
  • Surveying - chartered surveying, land economy, general practice
  • Military/naval roles
  • Party political work
  • Lobbying
  • Banking and financial analysis
  • Pressure group work
  • Marketing/PR
  • Teaching
  • Lecturing
  • Civil Service

Apply Now »

Note - you only need to make one application for A-levels. You can specify the additional A-Levels you wish to study when you fill out the application form

Did you find the course information on this page useful?

 

This course is run at the Joseph Wright Centre

About Joseph Wright Centre »

Hannah McDonald

Hannah McDonald

Confidence gained in English lectures helps A level student Hannah secure policing role

Confidence gained in English lectures helps A level student Hannah secure policing role Learning how to share her opinion, build her vocabulary and speak more effectively has given former Derby College A Levels student Hannah McDonald a good grounding for a career with the police.
 
Hannah, who is 18 and from Newton, is soon to become a Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) following a rigorous recruitment procedure.
 
She has also secured a place on the Professional Policing BA (Hons) degree course at Nottingham Trent University, deferred until September 2021.
 
In her PCSO role, Hannah will be based in Ripley and Chesterfield, supporting Derbyshire Police by going into schools to talk about issues such as knife crime and road safety. 
 
Hannah, who took law, psychology and combined English Literature and English Language A levels at Joseph Wright Centre, found her English lecturers especially helpful.
 
She said: “I’d thought English was all about reading books but it’s about so much more. It’s about being put under pressure and trusting your opinions enough to share them or put them in an essay, because English is so subjective and there’s never a wrong answer. In our English classes we gave PowerPoint presentations to the class, so we got used to sharing our ideas and opinions.
 
The course also enhanced my communication skills. It enabled me to build up my vocabulary to speak more effectively.”
 
These abilities gave Hannah the confidence to volunteer at a local primary school, helping children with maths and English, on her Wednesday mornings off from College – experience which she is  sure led to her getting her PCSO role.
 
She added: “There aren’t many PCSO places so it’s extremely competitive and it was a tough recruitment process. My English lecturers were incredibly supportive in helping me prepare my application, even though we’ve not been at College for months because of lockdown.
 
Going to JWC has definitely been confidence-building and a good grounding for my police career. My English teachers taught me how to speak up for myself and not be afraid to give my opinion.”

There aren’t many PCSO places so it’s extremely competitive and it was a tough recruitment process. My English lecturers were incredibly supportive in helping me prepare my application, even though we’ve not been at College for months because of lockdown.


“Going to JWC has definitely been confidence-building and a good grounding for my police career. My English teachers taught me how to speak up for myself and not be afraid to give my opinion.

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