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Apprenticeship - Engineering Manufacture - Machinist (Standard) - Level 3Apply Now »

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Level: 3

Location: The RoundHouse

Years: 4

Interview: Y

Course Summary

Machinists in the Advanced Manufacturing Engineering sector are predominantly involved in highly skilled, complex and precision work, machining components from specialist materials using conventional and/or CNC machine tools such as centre lathes, vertical and horizontal milling machines, horizontal and cylindrical grinding machines, electro discharge machines, and single and multi-axis CNC machine tools centres.

They will be expected to be able to set up, operate and adjust/edit equipment settings as applicable to the machine tool being used. When using CNC equipment, they
will be expected to be able to produce, prove and/or edit programmes. During and on completion of the machining operations, they will be expected to measure and check the components being produced and make adjustments to the equipment/programme to ensure components meet the required specification.

The apprenticeship typically lasts 42-48 months but timescales may vary depending on the apprentice's occupational role and/or their prior relevant qualifications/experience and Assessment of Prior Learning and Knowledge (APL/K) opportunities.

Entry requirements

Individual employers will set the recruitment and selection criteria for their apprenticeships. In order to optimise success, candidates will typically have four GCSEs at grade C/4 or equivalent, including Mathematics, English and a Science. Altermatively, they should be working at that level. 

Course Content

After a period of foundation skills and technical knowledge development, all apprentices will be required to achieve the following qualifications:

  • Level 2 Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Foundation Competence)
  • Level 2 Diploma in Machining (Foundation Knowledge)

After a further period of skills and technical knowledge development, all apprentices will be required to achieve the following qualifications:

  • Level 3 Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering - Machining (Development Competence) 
  • Level 3 Diploma in Machining (Development Knowledge)

How will I be assessed?

The apprentice will need the following specific  specialist knowledge:

  • understand the mathematical techniques, formula and calculation involved in the machining processes such as speeds and feeds, calculating angles/tapers and material removal
  • understand the practical and theoretical uses of the machines used and their applications
  • understand the work-holding devices, cutting tools and setting up procedures in adequate depth to provide a sound basis for carrying out the activities, correcting faults and ensuring the work output is to the required specification

They will also need the following specific specialist skills:

  • read and interpret relevant data and documentation used to produce machined components
  • determine the most efficient and effective approach to machine the component using a range of tools, machining processes and techniques
  • select and set up the correct tooling and work holding devices
  • set and adjust the machine operating parameters to produce the work pieces to the required specification. This will involve setting feeds and speeds for roughing and finishing operations
  • select and use a range of measuring and testing equipment to check components are to the required quality and accuracy
  • produce complex and specialist components as a one-off test and trial work piece and/or produce components in small or large batches
  • contribute to the business by identifying possible opportunities for improving working practices, processes and/or procedures

Are there any additional costs or specialist equipment required?

Apprentices will be expected to comply with their company's standard Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) dress code. Any shortfalls in safety equipment will be addressed during the first week of the course.

What can I do after this course?

Completion of this apprenticeship standard will be recognised by the relevant professional institutions as the evidence required for Engineering Technician (EngTech) registration through a professional review.

For those deemed capable and ready, there is the chance to progress to higher levels of education and training.

 

Did you find the course information on this page useful?

 

This course is run at the Roundhouse Campus

About the Roundhouse »

Pete Szabo

Pete Szabo

Shy student engineer Pete “grew” to enjoy distinguished police career

Shy student engineer Pete "grew" to enjoy distinguished police career. Retired police officer Pete Szabo was "painfully shy" and not "particularly bookish" as a young man...yet he went on to hold some of the most senior positions in the Derbyshire force. And, looking back, he credits his early training in an entirely different field at Derby College with broadening his skills, as he "grew" to pass his police training course with the second highest mark.
 
When he retired at the end of October, Pete, 52, had operational oversight of 680 officers and police staff, yet in the mid-1980s he worked as a laboratory technician in Belper. While Pete was with solid fuel business TI Parkray, he studied on release for a day-and-a half-a week, over four years, at Derby College. He gained his ONC and HNC engineering qualifications with passes and merits.
 
And his time at Derby College helped lay the foundations when he decided to change career and apply for the police. Pete progressed through the ranks, from PC, to becoming the youngest Sergeant at the time in Derbyshire, to Inspector and Chief Inspector. At one stage he headed Learning and Development for forces across the East Midlands. He retired as Chief Inspector and Operations Manager for the Derbyshire force. Pete is currently studying for a Chartered Management Institute (CMI) Level 5 qualification and said he intends to keep on learning.

For me, college was great. I was painfully shy at that stage and it helped me grow as a person, through meeting and learning from people from a wide range of backgrounds and different ages and cultures, and from various sections of industry like Rolls-Royce.


It gave me an early idea of public speaking and it gave me an insight into the academic world. I'm not the most bookish of people but I came out of my police training course with the second highest mark.

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