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Apprenticeship - Engineering Manufacture - Machinist (Standard) - Level 3Apply Now »

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Level: 3

Location: The RoundHouse

Years: 4

Interview: Y

Course Summary

Machinists in the Advanced Manufacturing Engineering sector are predominantly involved in highly skilled, complex and precision work, machining components from specialist materials using conventional and/or CNC machine tools such as centre lathes, vertical and horizontal milling machines, horizontal and cylindrical grinding machines, electro discharge machines, and single and multi-axis CNC machine tools centres.

They will be expected to be able to set up, operate and adjust/edit equipment settings as applicable to the machine tool being used. When using CNC equipment, they
will be expected to be able to produce, prove and/or edit programmes. During and on completion of the machining operations, they will be expected to measure and check the components being produced and make adjustments to the equipment/programme to ensure components meet the required specification.

The apprenticeship typically lasts 42-48 months but timescales may vary depending on the apprentice's occupational role and/or their prior relevant qualifications/experience and Assessment of Prior Learning and Knowledge (APL/K) opportunities.

Entry requirements

Individual employers will set the recruitment and selection criteria for their apprenticeships. In order to optimise success, candidates will typically have four GCSEs at grade C/4 or equivalent, including Mathematics, English and a Science. Altermatively, they should be working at that level. 

Course Content

After a period of foundation skills and technical knowledge development, all apprentices will be required to achieve the following qualifications:

  • Level 2 Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering (Foundation Competence)
  • Level 2 Diploma in Machining (Foundation Knowledge)

After a further period of skills and technical knowledge development, all apprentices will be required to achieve the following qualifications:

  • Level 3 Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering - Machining (Development Competence) 
  • Level 3 Diploma in Machining (Development Knowledge)

How will I be assessed?

The apprentice will need the following specific  specialist knowledge:

  • understand the mathematical techniques, formula and calculation involved in the machining processes such as speeds and feeds, calculating angles/tapers and material removal
  • understand the practical and theoretical uses of the machines used and their applications
  • understand the work-holding devices, cutting tools and setting up procedures in adequate depth to provide a sound basis for carrying out the activities, correcting faults and ensuring the work output is to the required specification

They will also need the following specific specialist skills:

  • read and interpret relevant data and documentation used to produce machined components
  • determine the most efficient and effective approach to machine the component using a range of tools, machining processes and techniques
  • select and set up the correct tooling and work holding devices
  • set and adjust the machine operating parameters to produce the work pieces to the required specification. This will involve setting feeds and speeds for roughing and finishing operations
  • select and use a range of measuring and testing equipment to check components are to the required quality and accuracy
  • produce complex and specialist components as a one-off test and trial work piece and/or produce components in small or large batches
  • contribute to the business by identifying possible opportunities for improving working practices, processes and/or procedures

Are there any additional costs or specialist equipment required?

Apprentices will be expected to comply with their company's standard Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) dress code. Any shortfalls in safety equipment will be addressed during the first week of the course.

What can I do after this course?

Completion of this apprenticeship standard will be recognised by the relevant professional institutions as the evidence required for Engineering Technician (EngTech) registration through a professional review.

For those deemed capable and ready, there is the chance to progress to higher levels of education and training.

 

Did you find the course information on this page useful?

 

This course is run at the Roundhouse Campus

About the Roundhouse »

Adrian Andres

Adrian Andres

Welding student Adrian excited to start Cavendish Nuclear apprenticeship

Former DCG Welding student Adrian Andres is excited to be starting an apprenticeship with a leading nuclear industry supplier.
 
Adrian, who is nearly 21 and from Derby, is one of three students from his level 3 welding course to have secured a place on Cavendish Nuclear’s coveted scheme.
 
And he is among eight young welders from that same college cohort to become an apprentice with a Babcock company. Five former students from his group are currently on apprenticeships with Doosan Babcock in the West Midlands.
 
Adrian, who has always wanted to be an engineer, took level 2 Performing Engineering Operations (PEO) at the Roundhouse, before moving on to level 3 Welding at the suggestion of his lecturer Sean Smith.
 
He said: "I really hadn’t thought about training to be a welder before that but the more I learned, the more motivated I became. Sean wanted us all to get quality apprenticeships so we’d have a great industry career and he really fought to get us the best opportunities.”
 
After beginning his four-year apprenticeship initially online in early September, Adrian will, after a couple of weeks, relocate to Somerset. He will spend one year full-time at Bridgwater & Taunton College before continuing his welding training on site.
 
He added: “Moving away from home doesn’t worry me. I’m excited to be starting my apprenticeship and I’m going to be training with people I already know. I expect the training to be hard and it’s going to be quite nerve wracking being watched by the tutors when we’re practising our welds.”
 
“I’m looking forward to qualifying as a welder. One of my dreams was to be a professional basketball player – I’ve played a lot of basketball all around England – but as I’m only 5ft 7 that wasn’t going to happen!  Training for a great job in engineering is something I can succeed in.”

I really hadn’t thought about training to be a welder before that but the more I learned, the more motivated I became. Sean wanted us all to get quality apprenticeships so we’d have a great industry career and he really fought to get us the best opportunities.

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