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Apprenticeship - Motor Vehicle Service and Maintenance Technician (Light Vehicle) - Level 3Apply Now »

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Level: 3

Location: Johnson Building

Years: 2

Interview: Y

Course Summary

A Motor Vehicle Service and Maintenance Technician services and repairs light vehicles such as cars and vans and works either in dealerships which focus on a particular manufacturer, or in an independent garage which deals with many different makes of vehicles.

The Automotive Retail Industry provides employment for over half a million employees who work for approximately 70,000 employers. It is a major contributor to the UK economy. In a large dealership, the technician will typically report to the Workshop Controller, who in turn reports to the Aftersales Manager and liaises with the Service Reception. In smaller garages the technician will report directly to the owner or garage manager.

The technician must be able to work independently but also operate as an effective team member and have good customer handling skills. They will understand how their workshop and the dealership/garage functions from a commercial perspective and identify ways in which they can work more efficiently. Technicians working in large dealerships work with other departments, for example carrying out work for the Sales Department and ordering parts from the Parts Department, whereas apprentices in smaller independent garages may be called upon to carry out some of the function of the other departments themselves, for example managing their own delivery of parts.

The technician will work on all the systems found within the vehicle. The day-to-day work ranges from replacing simple parts through to solving complex faults with the use of diagnostic methods and equipment. The tasks faced are constantly changing, driven by the introduction of ever more complex technologies and diagnostic techniques.

Entry requirements

Apprentices without Level 2 English and Maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the end-point assessment. For those with an education, health and care plan or a legacy statement, the apprenticeship's English and maths minimum requirement is Level 1. British Sign Language qualifications are an alternative to English qualifications where this is the apprentice's primary language.

Course Content

Motor vehicle service and maintenance technicians have the following knowledge and understanding:

  • How vehicle service and repair is impacted by legislative, regulatory and ethical requirements, including health and safety law and environmental procedures
  • The structure of the industry and how the business works from an operational perspective, business targets, and the systems and processes that make up the efficient running of a business
  • How to develop positive working relationships and communicate effectively and how to carry out self-evaluation and improve their own performance
  • The procedures for the maintenance of tools and the workshop
  • Routine servicing and inspection procedures
  • Steering and suspension geometries and electrical circuit requirements and calculations
  • Construction and operation of vehicle components and systems
  • Common fault types, causes and effects of different types of faults
  • The implications and legal requirements of fitting accessories and carrying out vehicle modifications
  • How to diagnose faults using suitable fault finding strategies
  • Construction and operation of advanced electrical, braking and suspension systems, engine and transmission systems and engine and gear calculations
  • Vehicle emissions and legal requirements
  • Alternative fuels and hybrid and electric systems

Motor Vehicle Service and Maintenance Technicians require the following skills so they are able to:

  • Contribute to the maintenance of a safe and efficient workshop
  • Demonstrate due regard for their own safety and that of others in the workshop and minimise risk of injury and vehicle damage
  • Carry out fundamental tasks associated with removal and replacement procedures on a vehicle
  • Obtain diagnostic and repair information
  • Interpret diagnostic information and use electrical wiring diagrams to determine system serviceability
  • Use a range of diagnostic equipment
  • Follow recognised diagnostic procedures and logical diagnostic sequence, applying advanced diagnostic principles and problem-solving techniques to establish faults
  • Report faults using company procedures and recommend suitable further actions
  • Follow recognised repair procedures to complete a wide range of repairs, including those which involve complex procedures or in-depth knowledge
  • Test the function of repaired and fitted components
  • Adhere to business processes and complete documentation following workplace procedures
  • Use ICT to create emails, word-process documents and carry out web-based searches
  • Complete a range of services and inspect and prepare a vehicle to the required quality standard for handover to the customer

How will I be assessed?

Prior to taking their end-point assessment (EPA), full-time apprentices will typically: 

  • Spend 36 months on the programme
  • Complete a minimum of 20% off-the-job training
  • Complete an F-Gas qualification
  • Complete a Logbook, used to inform the Professional Discussion
  • Achieve Level 2 in English and Maths, if they have not previously done so
The EPA should only start once the employer is satisfied that the requirements for EPA have been met and it must be completed within six months of the EPA gateway.
 
The EPA must be conducted by an organisation approved to offer services against this standard, as selected by the employer, from the Education and Skills Funding Agency’s Register of End-Point Assessment Organisations. 
 
The EPA consists of three distinct methods: 
  • Online Knowledge Test 
  • Skills Test 
  • Professional Discussion

Performance in the EPA will determine the apprenticeship grade of fail, pass or distinction. 

Are there any additional costs or specialist equipment required?

Apprentices will be expected to comply with their company's standard Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) dress code. Any shortfalls in safety equipment will be addressed during the first week of the course.

What can I do after this course?

Completion of this apprenticeship standard will be recognised by the relevant professional institutions as the evidence required for Engineering Technician (EngTech) registration through a professional review.

For those deemed capable and ready, there is the chance to progress to higher levels of education and training.

Did you find the course information on this page useful?

 

This course is run at the Johnson Building

About the Johnson Building »

Suhayl Bhikha

Suhayl Bhikha

Halfords and Derby College offer career switch from shopfront to Autocentre floor

The UK’s leading retailer of motoring products and services Halfords has teamed up with Derby College so that a talented employee can switch from the retail shop front to the Autocentre shop floor.
 
The move comes as part of a rolling company scheme which gives Halfords’ retail colleagues a chance to change direction and retrain as vehicle mechanics if they want a change in career path.
 
Suhayl Bhikha, 27, decided to apply to become a trainee mechanic and Derby College Group apprentice when he saw an internal email offering a potential new career.
 
He was highly praised in his role as a customer service adviser at Halfords’ Wyvern retail site but decided he wanted a new challenge.
 
Now he is six months into a two-year apprenticeship at the Halfords’ Autocentre based in Wyvern next door to his old job and working towards his Level 2 Autocare qualification at Derby College. He goes into the Johnson Building one day a week for workshop and classroom studies and regularly receives visits and phone calls at work from the college for appraisals and assessments. Throughout, he is mentored and trained on the job by experienced colleagues at Halfords.
 
Dave Nichols, who looks after the day to day running of the Halfords Autocentres’ apprentice programme, started as an apprentice himself 25 years ago in Essex. The company has 313 Autocentres and more than 120 apprentices on its books.
 
Dave said: “We chose Derby College for the qualification it provides, and its expertise and facilities. We had done some work with the college in the past, for part-time employment, and we were impressed by the quality of people who came through. The travelling distance is also good for our apprentices – we work with a lot of colleges across the UK and we want to give the best offer we possibly can for them.
 
“We’ve done a lot of work with our retail arm to give people opportunities to move around in the business and to give the right people the opportunity to move onto an apprenticeship. A lot of people may have been doing really well in retail but the next step was to go into a management role. Some of our colleagues don’t want to do that, it’s not the right pathway for them. This is a very real alternative for progression within the business.”
 
Suhayl said he was learning something new every time he went into college.
 
He said: “It’s good – very interesting. The company and college work well together. There’s a different challenge every day, whereas next door it was pretty much the same thing all the time. I applied for the apprenticeship because Halfords look after you and I wanted a career. I’ll get my qualification and decide from there what’s next for me.”
 
Dave said that Halfords offers its apprentices the opportunity to take Level 3 under its own internal training scheme and this allows them to  become accredited and then to become an MOT Tester. The company is due to take on a new cohort of apprentices in September, with the possibility of a further role coming up at its Derby West Autocentre

It’s good – very interesting. The company and college work well together.

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